Barmouth

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Barmouth is situated on the west coast of North Wales at the south west corner of Snowdonia National Park, arguably one of the most beautiful parks in Britain.

Lying between a mountain range and the sea on the mouth of the river Mawddach, Barmouth has old and new to please the traveler. Its history is linked closely with the shipping and slate industries. Be sure to see the old town with its steep steps and slate-roofed cottages on the side of a mountain. Enjoy its harbours, old and new. Take a walk across the spectacular Barmouth bridge spanning the river, and whatever you do, make sure you spend at least a day on the magnificent beach.
Before the arrival of the railway, Barmouth was renowned as a shipbuilding centre and bustling port. Today’s quay is still busy, with boats offering fishing trips and pleasure cruises or a ferry ride across the Mawddach to Fairbourne. Nearby is the RNLI Museum, with displays of life-saving paraphernalia, old photographs of Barmouth and model ships.

The medieval tower house, Ty Gwyn, now used as a local museum, with a shipwreck theme, is one of the oldest buildings in Barmouth. Built in 1460, it is believed to have been used as a meeting place for local supporters of the House of Lancaster in the War of the Roses.

Ty Crwn, (round house), is a 19th century prison, its shape designed so the devil had no corner to hide in and its curtain wall used to separate men and women prisoners. It was mostly used for the incarceration of drunken sailors.

Dinas Oleu, a four acre hill, behind Barmouth was the first property donated to the National Trust by philanthropist Fanny Talbot, a friend of two of the trust’s founders.

Barmouth is an ideal destination for those visitors seeking a lively centre, with safe sandy beaches in an area of remarkable beauty.
Walking

Barmouth is the starting place for many pleasant walks. The Mawddach estuary, with its steeply wooded slopes and its mountainous background is considered by many to be one of the most beautiful areas in Wales; a nine mile walk along its banks will take you to Dolgellau. A much shorter walk is the Panorama Walk, with equally breathtaking views.

There are miles of great walking, climbing and cycling routes, in fact Southern Snowdonia is an ideal base for the rambler who will find a host of new and delightful experiences within easy reach of Barmouth.

Follow disused railway lines, old miners’ and drovers’ trails or enjoy forays in the nearby forests. Explore hidden valleys, wild open moorland, lakes and mountains. Such a variety of unspoilt countryside and coastline provides the habitat for an abundance of wildlife – perfect for birdwatching or the opportunity sometimes to spot porpoise, seals and even Cardigan Bay dolphins.

If you like walking in company with experienced guides, the Barmouth Festival of Walking comes highly recommended, as one of three finalists for a 2007 Wales National Tourism Award, in the events category. For the more adventurous, climb Cader Idris or follow the Cambrian Way into the wild Rhinog Mountains.

Bring your bike, or hire one while you’re here and enjoy the the beautiful scenery as you cycle alongside the estuary or relish the challenges of world renowned mountain bike courses in Coed y Brenin forest.

Woodland, Wasteland & Resort Regeneration Follow restored paths, discover newly installed art works and enjoy glorious views over the estuary from Orielton woods. Access from the main road opposite the old harbour.

Alternatively, look out for pirates at Wern Mynach where a network of paths, a stream to play pooh sticks, plus several benches to sit back and enjoy, might make a pleasant change from the beach. Find the pirates’ ship moored alongside the football field at the end of Park Road.

Finally, a stroll around the Harbour will take you to a new water feature celebrating the Cardigan Bay dolphins.

Before the arrival of the railway, Barmouth was renowned as a shipbuilding centre and bustling port. Today’s quay is still busy, with boats offering fishing trips and pleasure cruises or a ferry ride across the Mawddach to Fairbourne. Nearby is the RNLI Museum, with displays of life-saving paraphernalia, old photographs of Barmouth and model ships.

The medieval tower house, Ty Gwyn, now used as a local museum, with a shipwreck theme, is one of the oldest buildings in Barmouth. Built in 1460, it is believed to have been used as a meeting place for local supporters of the House of Lancaster in the War of the Roses.

Ty Crwn, (round house), is a 19th century prison, its shape designed so the devil had no corner to hide in and its curtain wall used to separate men and women prisoners. It was mostly used for the incarceration of drunken sailors.

Dinas Oleu, a four acre hill, behind Barmouth was the first property donated to the National Trust by philanthropist Fanny Talbot, a friend of two of the trust’s founders.

Barmouth is an ideal destination for those visitors seeking a lively centre, with safe sandy beaches in an area of remarkable beauty.
Walking

Barmouth is the starting place for many pleasant walks. The Mawddach estuary, with its steeply wooded slopes and its mountainous background is considered by many to be one of the most beautiful areas in Wales; a nine mile walk along its banks will take you to Dolgellau. A much shorter walk is the Panorama Walk, with equally breathtaking views.

There are miles of great walking, climbing and cycling routes, in fact Southern Snowdonia is an ideal base for the rambler who will find a host of new and delightful experiences within easy reach of Barmouth.

Follow disused railway lines, old miners’ and drovers’ trails or enjoy forays in the nearby forests. Explore hidden valleys, wild open moorland, lakes and mountains. Such a variety of unspoilt countryside and coastline provides the habitat for an abundance of wildlife – perfect for birdwatching or the opportunity sometimes to spot porpoise, seals and even Cardigan Bay dolphins.

If you like walking in company with experienced guides, the Barmouth Festival of Walking comes highly recommended, as one of three finalists for a 2007 Wales National Tourism Award, in the events category. For the more adventurous, climb Cader Idris or follow the Cambrian Way into the wild Rhinog Mountains.

Bring your bike, or hire one while you’re here and enjoy the the beautiful scenery as you cycle alongside the estuary or relish the challenges of world renowned mountain bike courses in Coed y Brenin forest.

Woodland, Wasteland & Resort Regeneration Follow restored paths, discover newly installed art works and enjoy glorious views over the estuary from Orielton woods. Access from the main road opposite the old harbour.

Alternatively, look out for pirates at Wern Mynach where a network of paths, a stream to play pooh sticks, plus several benches to sit back and enjoy, might make a pleasant change from the beach. Find the pirates’ ship moored alongside the football field at the end of Park Road.

Finally, a stroll around the Harbour will take you to a new water feature celebrating the Cardigan Bay dolphins.

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